Thursday, April 15, 2010

Maritime Heritage - Kunjali Marakkar - 400 Years

The India's maritime heritage dates back to the Indus Valley Civilization (circa 3000 B.C.). The discovery of Lothal port and dock (circa 2400-1900 B.C.) bear testimony to this. After the landing of Vasco da Gama in Calicut in 1498 A.D., the Portuguese slowly gained influence and started interfering in the trade. Mohammed Kunjali Marakkar, the first Admiral of Calicut who offered to the Zamorin his sword, ships and services, dedicated his entire energies in fighting the foreign domination of Indian seas. He was the first of the four Kunjalis who played a heroic part in the Naval wars with the Portuguese. The most famous of the Marakkars was Kunjali IV, who fought the Portuguese more fiercely than his predecessors and with far greater success. However, the initial successes appear to have made him arrogant to the extent of ignoring the authority of the Zamorin. The Portuguese clinched a deal with Zamorin to suppress the 'rebel' Admiral, and in 1600 jointly laid siege of his fort, bringing to an end the long tradition of the legendary Marakkars. Kunjali IV who surrendered to the Zamorin was executed in Goa. The stamp design shows the war-paroe, a small craft used by the Kunjalis, which, manned by just 30-40 men each, could be rowed through lagoons and narrow waters.(Details from DKPNA)

If anybody has the above stamps for exchange or sell please let me know. 
Post a Comment